Author Topic: what am I doing now  (Read 6419 times)

ZULU40

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Re: what am I doing now
« Reply #60 on: May 15, 2018, 01:26:11 AM »
Both should have an aft rake, if the stay between the mast is correctly tensioned, the mizzen more than the main.
Photographs like this invite distortion which makes that a bit difficult to illustrate, adding to that is a little trim down by the bow.

The only discourse Ive been able to find from the designer is that the halyard on the main should fall to the deck 6" to 8" aft of the mast. My own mast has had its step replaced with a stainless steel one, during that replacement because I fitted the new step where the old one was there wasn't enough rake on the mast, so the step had to be hammered forward about an inch. Once the mast was pulled back using the backstay everything just fell into place.

Its interesting to watch a rigger at work on a mast, theyre so ductile the thing can be bent all over the place.
« Last Edit: May 15, 2018, 01:41:36 AM by ZULU40 »
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Re: what am I doing now
« Reply #61 on: May 27, 2018, 02:16:40 AM »
Sail bag for the main and a cover for the mizzen, triple fall jackstays have replaced the old and decrepit twin falls. The boats rig looks more complete and nice and tidy.

A Raymarine Chartplotter is discretely aboard attached to the forward side of the compass crash rail. I dont intend to add much to that except perhaps for AIS off of a VHF radio. This Raymarine unit looks like its about eight years old but came up very cheap and has internal GPS so there is little to install for it except power. I already have a stand alone depth sounder with large rectangular display but have yet to install it and the transducer which is of the in-hull type.

New instrument panel in the making makes an appearance, the old one from Westerbeke was cracked, had no cover, and had stopped sealing the wiring behind some time ago. A new white opening cover imported from China has been fitted where the old one used to be with butyl and stainless screws. It meant cutting the bulkhead aperture slightly larger from the cockpit side and inside the cabin. I'll have to fabricate a new panel cover for the back of the instruments for the cabin side in a similar fashion to how Pearson organised its former cousin. Must say it took a long time to make the panel and transfer the gauges with wiring, the things are just about an industry unto themselves. I made so many mistakes wiring the thing up that I have to question my diligence and competence. But Im happy with it now.

For the moment the instruments and switches are as they were on the old panel which got a bit destroyed in removing the key lock. But my intention is to update all the gauges with IP67 white face dials and stainless rims and most of the switchgear. Some interesting products around in dials now, backlit LED dials which offer both white and red backlighting, or just plain red. We might go with just red lit analogue dials, but the scary part is both the oil pressure and water temperature gauges will be requiring of like senders, and just what is the quality of the metal for those senders. Sitting on that little gem makes me apprehensive as Im trying to figure out if its possible to use the existing senders via some electrical modification.

A bunch of cabin lights have arrived which I bought because none of the existing had both a red/white function, and an Origo 3000 metho stove sits near me waiting to be partnered up with a microwave oven slung beneath it. The delay in fitting this is the original gas stove which is nearly new is still on the boat, I dont have a suitable microwave yet, I cant figure out a tray for protecting the microwave from stove spills, and I have no gimbals. All of which are not particularly difficult to solve but it takes time.
« Last Edit: May 27, 2018, 02:27:25 AM by ZULU40 »
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ZULU40

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Re: what am I doing now
« Reply #62 on: July 19, 2018, 03:54:59 PM »
ok been awhile but Im still kicking, the weathers been pretty ordinary so I still dont have any good images of the sail bag on the main or the cover over the mizzen.

Ive been messing with the interior mostly, not that theres a lot to show for it
There are a series of LED lights fitted over the nav station and over the fridge
these have the capability to light up white or red to save night vision.
There is a plastic background above it to hide the many bits of junk previous owners had fitted in the ceiling of the nav station, and the VHF is just sitting there on chan 12 which listens to traffic on the river. Not sure whether to keep it, it doesnt have AIS or scanning for other channels, which seems to me to be the whole point of a radio with more than one channel

Also to be seen in the nav station there is a pair of digital voltmeters for the two battery banks, in the colours appropriate for port (engine) and starboard battery (house)
In this way the output of each battery is instantly visible day or night, and theres no mistaking which battery is which. Believe it or not it took a few days to get it all together

Because the laws in SA are different to Queensland I would have had to get a gasfitter aboard to fit in a cut off switch that SA requires, that and I wasnt fond of the thing (being gas) anyway even though it was kind of pretty. So I sold off my gas range for 500 notes and fitted a Swedish metho stove which I got from ebay for about half price of new, together with a countertop convection oven which is 240 volt. I guess this means oven cooking will only be happening in marinas unless I get a gen set, but Im ok with that. As it happens Im a pretty ordinary chef anyway :)

Mating the oven and stove together meant devising a box out of plywood and epoxy, and figuring out a method to gimbal it with a latch or lock.
In the end the gimbal was created from chair castors where one has a brake which also locks the wheel direction. The wheels were tossed and a piece of timber was fashioned to fit in place. It seems to operate just fine. Some polished aluminium checkerplate attaches the stove the gimbal and the oven box which is basically of filleted and taped plywood painted with resin. Stainless bolts and dome nuts are going on attaching the bits together. The photo shows the stove in situ but just kinda sitting in there. Its a fifteen minute job to finish that, and then all that remains is fitting an outlet plug.

The only other thing inside the boat is a Rule low profile bilge pump which being lower will keep it drier than the 2000. Not sure what to do with the 2000 now though, either push it up further forward or set it too the higher water mark maybe a foot or so above the LP pump, both on separate circuits. Regardless it was a good thing to do because I found a defect in the outlet hose. So I might end up with 2 pumps both automatically switched pushing a theoretical 2900 gallons an hour through 1-1/2" line out through the transom. Or maybe situate the 2000 further forwrd.

Outside the boat Ive fitted an older 9" Raymarine chartplotter with GPS in somewhat of a novel position. I didnt want it too high just so I could see it behind the compass, I really am not fond of helms with giant screens that cover a bunch of the forward view so this simple fitment reflects that philosophy.

Also to be found in the cockpit is a new instrument cluster which I made from plastic sheet. It was kind of a thing for awhile as swapping the dials over to the new panel meant stripping the broken leaking and cracked Westerbeke panel entirely then reassembling all the bits in the new panel. I was sure I made enough notes to get the job done but it turned out I really hadnt; fortunately I had a few photos of the wiring to assist. The panel fits inside a chinese ABS opening portlight I bought on ebay for 50 bucks. In this way most of the time the instruments are worthily protected, and you simply open the port to fire up the engine. All the wiring is in for lighting the instruments as well, but theres no back to it yet. The only bad thing about it is it seems to have a slight tint in the glass, which is a bit darker in the photo than reality.

One other thing remains on the current project list, Im fitting an emergency anchor in place, its just a small 16lb danforth with 30ft of chain and about 100ft of nylon rode. The anchor will be stored in the lazarette or one of the sail lockers and is there just to toss over the stern should the engine quit in close manoeuvring. Its always been somewhat of a nightmare of mine that something goes wrong in a marina, the river or anchorage where the depth is relatively shallow and it takes too long to deploy the main anchor. The rode is separable so it could pass for a tow or simply to trail the Zodiac.

I also received some other bits, a couple of blade fuse blocks with common rails, 20 new switches with light up LED ends (some of the existing are a bit more dodgy than the wiring) which I intend to apply to a new main switchboard. And I have a separate depthsounder with in-hull transducer and a 4" liquid crystal display.

Ugh speaking of which, the transom in the Zodiac is 1" ply and wet rotten all along the bottom. Its drying out right now while I figure out how to remove it and replace it with a plywood and epoxy replica, as it should have been all along. It also gives me time to figure out why the valve leaks on one chamber despite having replaced it.

Images of the nav station LED lighting and the battery bank voltmeters, yet to install a tide clock and barometer
the stove assembled and just held in place
LED lights over the countertop, in the background the backside of the instrument cluster that hasnt got  framed cover yet
and the chartplotter situation

apologies for the apparent mess, but there are quite a few things going on at once.



« Last Edit: July 19, 2018, 04:16:01 PM by ZULU40 »
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Re: what am I doing now
« Reply #63 on: July 19, 2018, 03:56:47 PM »
Just a few more shots, it was a shitty dark wet bitch of a day
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Re: what am I doing now
« Reply #64 on: July 28, 2018, 04:02:17 PM »
a few views of the boat with her sail bag for the main and just a cover for the mizzen
The main halyard had become trapped the wrong side of the upper lazy jacks. The risk is here that if you just let the halyard go once you raise it to restore its location the right side of the lazy jack, as it gets up high on the mast its own weight can carry it off the pulley. So I sent it up with a container of deck wash, waited for it to settle in the right place and let it fall back to the deck.

Need to review these topping lifts.
Because the boat has no ladder it could be very difficult to get an MOB back on the boat. With this in mind and for handling the dinghy and/or outboard Im making up a removable gun tackle to be able to crane things on and off the boat. The topping lifts will therefore be loaded a lot harder and I know the present set up isnt up to it. With that done the mainsheet tackle could be disconnected, the gun tackle rigged, and the boom craned over the side

The aft anchor is sorted and in the lazarette with 10m 8mm chain and 30m 16mm nylon rode.
Its a danforth pattern so perhaps less useful for weedy areas which is the common situation here,
but its intended for the river out to sea and the marina should the engine let go.
.... and then theres the jiffy reefing ..

images in HDR off my Olympus dSLR
« Last Edit: July 28, 2018, 04:04:12 PM by ZULU40 »
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ZULU40

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Re: what am I doing now
« Reply #65 on: August 02, 2018, 01:59:08 AM »
In other news she now has a real topping lift
mostly because I dont have a ladder and there is no other way to get a MOB back aboard
other than using a sling and a tackle craned off the boom
To do this the main boom needed a proper topping lift

at some point I will have to get to these portlights
playing with photoshop

« Last Edit: August 02, 2018, 02:09:33 AM by ZULU40 »
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Re: what am I doing now
« Reply #66 on: August 02, 2018, 04:39:27 AM »
and among other jobs
the new 1" plywood transom for the Zodiac sits behind its former rotted pattern
It will have to be coated with epoxy and painted once the scupper is cut in
while the Zodiac sits transomless waiting for the old adhesive is cleaned off and the new transom is installed
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Re: what am I doing now
« Reply #67 on: August 11, 2018, 01:47:29 AM »
Ok so the struggle of wills with the Zodiac goes on
Its taken a long time to clear away all the old adhesive and the remaining fixtures for the transom
This is probably peculiar to Zodiac, and I understand why they have don it this way, but I think they fell a bit short when they built these boats
The transoms should have been epoxied to protect the plies, and it is a common fault to these boats.

You buy a Zodiac its either going to be hypalon or PVC. Both will have a plywood transom, this ones an inch thick.
Problem for them is, the adhesive wont stick to the plywood, so they cant join the transom to the boat.
While there is a work around I will describe later, this probably isnt good enough for the critical part of the boat that carries the power unit.

The way they get around this is to mechanically heat bond a white plastic edge to the plywood, so all they have to worry about is the plastic bond to the cuffs pf the transom support.
This particular bit of plastic is both glued and heat bonded around the ends of the transom through holes allowing both sides of the plastic to be joined.
There were 9 holes per side each about 3/8" in diameter, and the bond between the two parts was almost perfectly executed with a good merge between the cuffs and the transom
While MEK is of some use on the easy bits, mostly the entire parts have to be cut out of the boat with a knife after heat gun, which turns the white plastic into the consistency of an eraser rubber

Obviously this quite clever process is something I cant replicate, and at the same time I desire to coat the transom with epoxy so Im not doing this again in 5 years.
So my problem now is gluing the epoxy coated plywood transom to the PVC edges of the transom cuffs on the main tubes of the boat
Its the same old rule, PVC glue wont stick to epoxy, while I could probably epoxy the transom to the cuffs, but it wont ever come out ever again
While thats still a possibility there is one other way I can think of.

I can use hypalon adhesive painted on the transom, because PVC glue will stick to it. I know of zodiac repairers that have done this.
So I can go ahead with the epoxy transom, use 5200 all around the cuffs which offers at least some chance of repair removal later, and PVC/hypalon on the bottom of the boat
I just think that in this place the more malleable properties of 5200 is desirous instead of an epoxy joint that will be rock hard
For additional security the transom could have as many as 18 3/8" bolts mechanically securing the parts together
A test fit carried out the other day suggests that once this thing is back together I cant see why it would fall apart other than adhesives totally failing

The attached images demonstrate the trial fit of the transom
You can see the black cuff that supports the plywood transom where it secures to the boat
These parts I think I will flood with 5200 after the transom is flow coated, and the bond to the ply will use the hypalon adhesive trick to glue the material to the plywood bottom


« Last Edit: August 11, 2018, 01:56:20 AM by ZULU40 »
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Re: what am I doing now
« Reply #68 on: August 18, 2018, 07:35:46 AM »
Last complete test fit before sticking stuff together
Boss keeping an eye on things in the background
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Re: what am I doing now
« Reply #69 on: September 11, 2018, 02:55:41 PM »
Ok so the Zodiac fix seems to be good and the 5200 has fully cured, but now begins the saga of the Zodiacs outboard

Back when I bought the boat the 5hp Yamaha was on the aft rail for her tender, I think I was understandably more concerned about Zaya than a $300 outboard.
But now I need the tender and thought I would look at this outboard which sat neglected in the shed. On picking it up I can hear the jangle of bits under the cover. Taking the lid off leaves me looking at the choke opening of the carby. As Im thinking that doesnt look right I touch t and it moves, the carby came off in my hand totally disconnected from the engine. Below it where other screws and parts someone had left there.

So it takes like an hour to figure out how to get the thing in one piece, Ive got a new spark plug and year old 2 stroke fuel, lets see if it starts. No go, Im now finding theres no spark so off to a mates place to see what he thinks. He quickly points out the engine isolator which I forgot about, as I typically throw stuff like that over the side its purpose escaped me. Now we have spark, about 5 pulls and it runs, and now restarts first pull, but it isnt pumping water from the barrel below out of the engine. We take out the water pump for which the impeller seems ok but is blocked with salt. Also found corroded and broken the raw water inlet pipe to the block from the pump. Now the decision is made that the engine is worth getting a few bits, the impeller and throttle cable.

Persevered with desalting the engine but there are a lot of spaces I cant reach. Chemical avenues are next but vinegar and pressure wont budge it. Put together a solution of 20% hydrochloric acid and water. plug the other end of the water gallery and pour the stuff in. It bubbled fumed and smoked spectacularly for an hour and was poured out, along with what remained of the salt. Flushing proved the galleries were now nice and clear and so having obtained a suitable length of copper tube for the feed pipe I just await the new parts. I did manage to score a Yamaha brand fuel tank that has a level gauge for 50 bucks so that was a bit of a win. Which added a fuel line and bulb with Yamaha plug ends to the list of spares.

Below is the completed tender and the bubbling, smoking, steaming acid in the engine block of the Yamaha
It was late so colour temperature is a bit out due to low sun, ... so it is what it is ...
.
« Last Edit: September 11, 2018, 02:58:50 PM by ZULU40 »
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Re: what am I doing now
« Reply #70 on: October 06, 2018, 11:01:02 AM »
One step forward. two steps back

I happened upon a couple of alternators that were going to go to parts, but I thought Id check out the easy things on them before passing them in.
The second failed the continuity test between the slip rings, so the stator connection was lost somewhere. Its not usual for this to occur within the windings, it is usually parted at or near the slipring. So I took it down but at first glance everything looked normal, only on probing the connections it became clear that the connection was parted under the insulation. On removing half the insulation the break was visible so I soldered it back together, used some brush on insulation, which gives me a fully working alternator out of the four I have.

Another remaining job was the back of the instrument panel. The panel had been replaced after the last passed on, it was recessed behind an opening portlight providing watertight access to the panel heat and start buttons. As this was too big for the existing rear frame for inside the cabin I went about making a new one. Doubled marine ply which allows a step for an acrylic back and makes the border frame a lot more sturdy. Epoxied the lot together then straight on to the bulkhead below the bridgedeck its decently thick at 3/4" at its thickest. Once the epoxy had set the backing film was removed from the acrylic and screwed down with white panel screws. Im thinking of putting a clock, tide clock and barometer on there, it just looks a bit bare with nothing on it.

Among the next projects; I have to fit an alternator, fit a 12v power supply for a TV that might not have regulated power, install the horn, fit some LED candlelights supporting frames and shades and figure out how the reefing system was now one year ago. Replacing the mizzen topping lift, fitting the VHF antenna atop the mizzen, going up the main for the spreader lights will have to wait along with about 20 other things. I still dont have a repair for the fridge :(

Images:
The state of the rear instrument cluster while the new frame was epoxied to the bulkhead
the acrylic backing adjusted to fit (this is a 6th of a second in quite low light)
the overall appearance once complete

« Last Edit: October 06, 2018, 11:09:28 AM by ZULU40 »
Further South than South is
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Re: what am I doing now
« Reply #71 on: October 11, 2018, 08:22:40 AM »
Just a few odd jobs

I acquired some bits for stupid cheap and thought I would make some candle holders for the cabins
They wont be flame candles as they would require drip trays, but LED ones off ebay
I had various diameters of tube too thin for structural use, cut to length and and the ends just plug on
I also have a half dozen miniature lamp shades meant for chandeliers that are just about the right size
I got the two smallest together quite quickly for the forward cabin

That was progressed as far as I could go so I finished putting together the Prestolite alternator
The stator has continuity, the brushes are good and the diodes pass the static test, but there were a few issues with insulation on the end frame that needed some attention.
This alternator had been recording low voltage of 12.7v but I suspect its the regulator now. which is non adjustable
Anyway I need an alternator on the boat whether it works of not because I have to move Zaya across the marina, the boat show will be taking up all of my pier

Images : list of parts
assembled small frames
unit with faux candle and shade
diode check on the Prestolite
« Last Edit: October 11, 2018, 08:28:35 AM by ZULU40 »
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Re: what am I doing now
« Reply #72 on: October 24, 2018, 09:46:25 AM »
Two little projects from home

I needed to be able to place a barometer somewhere meaningful, and I also have a tide clock to share with it
When I found an ordinary clock of the same pattern as the tide clock I decided to use some ply to make a panel for the three dials

Only issue is the two clocks are quartz so require an aperture through the panel to adjust them or swap out batteries
The barometer is deeper than either of those but its face has less height. So 3 holes and a raised mount for the barometer in the middle
I just cut the whole thing out and applied epoxy, just got through the second coat, there will be three.

Another little thing was the Yamaha 5hp tank was junked because it went rusty and leaked, but I have a remote tank for it anyway
But that leaves a hole where the filler was so that had to be dealt with
the outboard is now sealed and its actually a bit lighter to haul aboard without the tank
the crudiness means it wont get stolen, I might mark it down from 5 hp to 3 or something for the same reason

Images:
a view of the dials, the barometer is a garden variety german from around the 50s test fit into the panel
the panel with its second coat of epoxy
the glorious Yamaha looking suitably beat up lid which will remain so as an anti theft strategy


« Last Edit: October 24, 2018, 09:48:46 AM by ZULU40 »
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Re: what am I doing now
« Reply #73 on: October 27, 2018, 11:27:00 AM »
So the panel is done, but Im not happy with it
The first 2 coats of epoxy went perfectly, but the third might have been affected by residual wax
It became patchy with pores of no resin in the 3rd coat. I sanded it off and began again
but this application isnt as perfect as the first 2, Im just a bit pissed with it so will leave it for now and fit it inside Zaya
In time for that the clock arrived through the week and was fitted to the panel

Another example of the candle holder is shown with an LED candle, easy to do and simpler
Once a shade is fitted with their flickering flame, they are quite convincing but the chandelier shades might be a tad too dark
Ive found that something as simple as a paper cup makes a very good diffusing shade and is quite bright, considering
These LED candles will stay alight for 500 hours on 2 AA batteries and dont require of any wiring
But they are more for their warming effect than they are the light put out, that being said they are bright enough to more around an otherwise dark cabin in safety

For some crazy reason I decided to shoot these at night
shutter speeds are over a second, so theyre not especially sharp
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Re: what am I doing now
« Reply #74 on: November 09, 2018, 06:51:06 PM »
The panel saw a slight revision, it has semi circular ends which makes more sense and a rounded top
and since Im unsure of whether to keep or change the wood stain for the interior Ive let it go for now.

The other images show one of the simpler lamps for the forward cabin
and a half section of the boat playing with engine access among other things ..

Moving the engine forward, in this case some 18", would certainly improve access which is in my view pretty terrible at the moment
and it would mean the sail lockers could be better partitioned off so that they could finally be better organised,
ultimately holding more gear that doesnt get turfed out of the locker whenever you have to look at the engine.
« Last Edit: November 09, 2018, 07:10:15 PM by ZULU40 »
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