Author Topic: what am I doing now  (Read 4139 times)

ZULU40

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Re: what am I doing now
« Reply #60 on: May 15, 2018, 01:26:11 AM »
Both should have an aft rake, if the stay between the mast is correctly tensioned, the mizzen more than the main.
Photographs like this invite distortion which makes that a bit difficult to illustrate, adding to that is a little trim down by the bow.

The only discourse Ive been able to find from the designer is that the halyard on the main should fall to the deck 6" to 8" aft of the mast. My own mast has had its step replaced with a stainless steel one, during that replacement because I fitted the new step where the old one was there wasn't enough rake on the mast, so the step had to be hammered forward about an inch. Once the mast was pulled back using the backstay everything just fell into place.

Its interesting to watch a rigger at work on a mast, theyre so ductile the thing can be bent all over the place.
« Last Edit: May 15, 2018, 01:41:36 AM by ZULU40 »
Further South than South is
Hull #103

ZULU40

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Re: what am I doing now
« Reply #61 on: May 27, 2018, 02:16:40 AM »
Sail bag for the main and a cover for the mizzen, triple fall jackstays have replaced the old and decrepit twin falls. The boats rig looks more complete and nice and tidy.

A Raymarine Chartplotter is discretely aboard attached to the forward side of the compass crash rail. I dont intend to add much to that except perhaps for AIS off of a VHF radio. This Raymarine unit looks like its about eight years old but came up very cheap and has internal GPS so there is little to install for it except power. I already have a stand alone depth sounder with large rectangular display but have yet to install it and the transducer which is of the in-hull type.

New instrument panel in the making makes an appearance, the old one from Westerbeke was cracked, had no cover, and had stopped sealing the wiring behind some time ago. A new white opening cover imported from China has been fitted where the old one used to be with butyl and stainless screws. It meant cutting the bulkhead aperture slightly larger from the cockpit side and inside the cabin. I'll have to fabricate a new panel cover for the back of the instruments for the cabin side in a similar fashion to how Pearson organised its former cousin. Must say it took a long time to make the panel and transfer the gauges with wiring, the things are just about an industry unto themselves. I made so many mistakes wiring the thing up that I have to question my diligence and competence. But Im happy with it now.

For the moment the instruments and switches are as they were on the old panel which got a bit destroyed in removing the key lock. But my intention is to update all the gauges with IP67 white face dials and stainless rims and most of the switchgear. Some interesting products around in dials now, backlit LED dials which offer both white and red backlighting, or just plain red. We might go with just red lit analogue dials, but the scary part is both the oil pressure and water temperature gauges will be requiring of like senders, and just what is the quality of the metal for those senders. Sitting on that little gem makes me apprehensive as Im trying to figure out if its possible to use the existing senders via some electrical modification.

A bunch of cabin lights have arrived which I bought because none of the existing had both a red/white function, and an Origo 3000 metho stove sits near me waiting to be partnered up with a microwave oven slung beneath it. The delay in fitting this is the original gas stove which is nearly new is still on the boat, I dont have a suitable microwave yet, I cant figure out a tray for protecting the microwave from stove spills, and I have no gimbals. All of which are not particularly difficult to solve but it takes time.
« Last Edit: May 27, 2018, 02:27:25 AM by ZULU40 »
Further South than South is
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ZULU40

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Re: what am I doing now
« Reply #62 on: July 19, 2018, 03:54:59 PM »
ok been awhile but Im still kicking, the weathers been pretty ordinary so I still dont have any good images of the sail bag on the main or the cover over the mizzen.

Ive been messing with the interior mostly, not that theres a lot to show for it
There are a series of LED lights fitted over the nav station and over the fridge
these have the capability to light up white or red to save night vision.
There is a plastic background above it to hide the many bits of junk previous owners had fitted in the ceiling of the nav station, and the VHF is just sitting there on chan 12 which listens to traffic on the river. Not sure whether to keep it, it doesnt have AIS or scanning for other channels, which seems to me to be the whole point of a radio with more than one channel

Also to be seen in the nav station there is a pair of digital voltmeters for the two battery banks, in the colours appropriate for port (engine) and starboard battery (house)
In this way the output of each battery is instantly visible day or night, and theres no mistaking which battery is which. Believe it or not it took a few days to get it all together

Because the laws in SA are different to Queensland I would have had to get a gasfitter aboard to fit in a cut off switch that SA requires, that and I wasnt fond of the thing (being gas) anyway even though it was kind of pretty. So I sold off my gas range for 500 notes and fitted a Swedish metho stove which I got from ebay for about half price of new, together with a countertop convection oven which is 240 volt. I guess this means oven cooking will only be happening in marinas unless I get a gen set, but Im ok with that. As it happens Im a pretty ordinary chef anyway :)

Mating the oven and stove together meant devising a box out of plywood and epoxy, and figuring out a method to gimbal it with a latch or lock.
In the end the gimbal was created from chair castors where one has a brake which also locks the wheel direction. The wheels were tossed and a piece of timber was fashioned to fit in place. It seems to operate just fine. Some polished aluminium checkerplate attaches the stove the gimbal and the oven box which is basically of filleted and taped plywood painted with resin. Stainless bolts and dome nuts are going on attaching the bits together. The photo shows the stove in situ but just kinda sitting in there. Its a fifteen minute job to finish that, and then all that remains is fitting an outlet plug.

The only other thing inside the boat is a Rule low profile bilge pump which being lower will keep it drier than the 2000. Not sure what to do with the 2000 now though, either push it up further forward or set it too the higher water mark maybe a foot or so above the LP pump, both on separate circuits. Regardless it was a good thing to do because I found a defect in the outlet hose. So I might end up with 2 pumps both automatically switched pushing a theoretical 2900 gallons an hour through 1-1/2" line out through the transom. Or maybe situate the 2000 further forwrd.

Outside the boat Ive fitted an older 9" Raymarine chartplotter with GPS in somewhat of a novel position. I didnt want it too high just so I could see it behind the compass, I really am not fond of helms with giant screens that cover a bunch of the forward view so this simple fitment reflects that philosophy.

Also to be found in the cockpit is a new instrument cluster which I made from plastic sheet. It was kind of a thing for awhile as swapping the dials over to the new panel meant stripping the broken leaking and cracked Westerbeke panel entirely then reassembling all the bits in the new panel. I was sure I made enough notes to get the job done but it turned out I really hadnt; fortunately I had a few photos of the wiring to assist. The panel fits inside a chinese ABS opening portlight I bought on ebay for 50 bucks. In this way most of the time the instruments are worthily protected, and you simply open the port to fire up the engine. All the wiring is in for lighting the instruments as well, but theres no back to it yet. The only bad thing about it is it seems to have a slight tint in the glass, which is a bit darker in the photo than reality.

One other thing remains on the current project list, Im fitting an emergency anchor in place, its just a small 16lb danforth with 30ft of chain and about 100ft of nylon rode. The anchor will be stored in the lazarette or one of the sail lockers and is there just to toss over the stern should the engine quit in close manoeuvring. Its always been somewhat of a nightmare of mine that something goes wrong in a marina, the river or anchorage where the depth is relatively shallow and it takes too long to deploy the main anchor. The rode is separable so it could pass for a tow or simply to trail the Zodiac.

I also received some other bits, a couple of blade fuse blocks with common rails, 20 new switches with light up LED ends (some of the existing are a bit more dodgy than the wiring) which I intend to apply to a new main switchboard. And I have a separate depthsounder with in-hull transducer and a 4" liquid crystal display.

Ugh speaking of which, the transom in the Zodiac is 1" ply and wet rotten all along the bottom. Its drying out right now while I figure out how to remove it and replace it with a plywood and epoxy replica, as it should have been all along. It also gives me time to figure out why the valve leaks on one chamber despite having replaced it.

Images of the nav station LED lighting and the battery bank voltmeters, yet to install a tide clock and barometer
the stove assembled and just held in place
LED lights over the countertop, in the background the backside of the instrument cluster that hasnt got  framed cover yet
and the chartplotter situation

apologies for the apparent mess, but there are quite a few things going on at once.



« Last Edit: July 19, 2018, 04:16:01 PM by ZULU40 »
Further South than South is
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ZULU40

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Re: what am I doing now
« Reply #63 on: July 19, 2018, 03:56:47 PM »
Just a few more shots, it was a shitty dark wet bitch of a day
Further South than South is
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ZULU40

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Re: what am I doing now
« Reply #64 on: July 28, 2018, 04:02:17 PM »
a few views of the boat with her sail bag for the main and just a cover for the mizzen
The main halyard had become trapped the wrong side of the upper lazy jacks. The risk is here that if you just let the halyard go once you raise it to restore its location the right side of the lazy jack, as it gets up high on the mast its own weight can carry it off the pulley. So I sent it up with a container of deck wash, waited for it to settle in the right place and let it fall back to the deck.

Need to review these topping lifts.
Because the boat has no ladder it could be very difficult to get an MOB back on the boat. With this in mind and for handling the dinghy and/or outboard Im making up a removable gun tackle to be able to crane things on and off the boat. The topping lifts will therefore be loaded a lot harder and I know the present set up isnt up to it. With that done the mainsheet tackle could be disconnected, the gun tackle rigged, and the boom craned over the side

The aft anchor is sorted and in the lazarette with 10m 8mm chain and 30m 16mm nylon rode.
Its a danforth pattern so perhaps less useful for weedy areas which is the common situation here,
but its intended for the river out to sea and the marina should the engine let go.
.... and then theres the jiffy reefing ..

images in HDR off my Olympus dSLR
« Last Edit: July 28, 2018, 04:04:12 PM by ZULU40 »
Further South than South is
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ZULU40

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Re: what am I doing now
« Reply #65 on: August 02, 2018, 01:59:08 AM »
In other news she now has a real topping lift
mostly because I dont have a ladder and there is no other way to get a MOB back aboard
other than using a sling and a tackle craned off the boom
To do this the main boom needed a proper topping lift

at some point I will have to get to these portlights
playing with photoshop

« Last Edit: August 02, 2018, 02:09:33 AM by ZULU40 »
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Re: what am I doing now
« Reply #66 on: August 02, 2018, 04:39:27 AM »
and among other jobs
the new 1" plywood transom for the Zodiac sits behind its former rotted pattern
It will have to be coated with epoxy and painted once the scupper is cut in
while the Zodiac sits transomless waiting for the old adhesive is cleaned off and the new transom is installed
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Re: what am I doing now
« Reply #67 on: August 11, 2018, 01:47:29 AM »
Ok so the struggle of wills with the Zodiac goes on
Its taken a long time to clear away all the old adhesive and the remaining fixtures for the transom
This is probably peculiar to Zodiac, and I understand why they have don it this way, but I think they fell a bit short when they built these boats
The transoms should have been epoxied to protect the plies, and it is a common fault to these boats.

You buy a Zodiac its either going to be hypalon or PVC. Both will have a plywood transom, this ones an inch thick.
Problem for them is, the adhesive wont stick to the plywood, so they cant join the transom to the boat.
While there is a work around I will describe later, this probably isnt good enough for the critical part of the boat that carries the power unit.

The way they get around this is to mechanically heat bond a white plastic edge to the plywood, so all they have to worry about is the plastic bond to the cuffs pf the transom support.
This particular bit of plastic is both glued and heat bonded around the ends of the transom through holes allowing both sides of the plastic to be joined.
There were 9 holes per side each about 3/8" in diameter, and the bond between the two parts was almost perfectly executed with a good merge between the cuffs and the transom
While MEK is of some use on the easy bits, mostly the entire parts have to be cut out of the boat with a knife after heat gun, which turns the white plastic into the consistency of an eraser rubber

Obviously this quite clever process is something I cant replicate, and at the same time I desire to coat the transom with epoxy so Im not doing this again in 5 years.
So my problem now is gluing the epoxy coated plywood transom to the PVC edges of the transom cuffs on the main tubes of the boat
Its the same old rule, PVC glue wont stick to epoxy, while I could probably epoxy the transom to the cuffs, but it wont ever come out ever again
While thats still a possibility there is one other way I can think of.

I can use hypalon adhesive painted on the transom, because PVC glue will stick to it. I know of zodiac repairers that have done this.
So I can go ahead with the epoxy transom, use 5200 all around the cuffs which offers at least some chance of repair removal later, and PVC/hypalon on the bottom of the boat
I just think that in this place the more malleable properties of 5200 is desirous instead of an epoxy joint that will be rock hard
For additional security the transom could have as many as 18 3/8" bolts mechanically securing the parts together
A test fit carried out the other day suggests that once this thing is back together I cant see why it would fall apart other than adhesives totally failing

The attached images demonstrate the trial fit of the transom
You can see the black cuff that supports the plywood transom where it secures to the boat
These parts I think I will flood with 5200 after the transom is flow coated, and the bond to the ply will use the hypalon adhesive trick to glue the material to the plywood bottom


« Last Edit: August 11, 2018, 01:56:20 AM by ZULU40 »
Further South than South is
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