Author Topic: what am I doing now  (Read 2823 times)

S/V AMITY

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Re: what am I doing now
« Reply #45 on: January 22, 2018, 08:17:45 PM »
   As they used to say in the old '60's hippie days, "Keep the faith baby".

   My soapbox:  Why, in the name of he** don't these naval designers design in serviceability???  Do they honestly believe a critical component will never need service/repair/replacement?  Pearson isn't the only offender by a long shot.  And a mild steel mast step which bilge water regularly drains over?  This is basic stuff.  Things that are nigh on impossible to service wind up not being serviced until there's a failure and a failure on a boat can be catastrophic.  End of soapbox.

  Add some flowery-smelling detergent to the water in the fuel tank.  This will emulsify the remaining diesel, kill the fumes & be kinder to your nose.

ZULU40

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Re: what am I doing now
« Reply #46 on: January 23, 2018, 05:56:44 AM »
As they used to say in the old '60's hippie days, "Keep the faith baby".

hey I was there then ...

Today had some progress, even if for a few hours.
The top 40% of the tank is out, and it reveals some things that are perhaps of interest. Below there are a few shots, one with the missing section that shows the baffle for the tank which is riveted to the edges. If you look carefully you can see where my horizontal cut sliced right through it. And you can see on the top of the baffle where the blade skirted along the edge of it.

According to my vernier the steel is 2mm thick sheet, which as sheet is known to do would work harden, hence become more brittle in time. There was no protection for corrosion within and the inside of the top reveals like corrosion. On the top is a plate to say the tank was pressure tested to 3psi. The scorch marks round the edges suggest the tank was likely gas welded together.

I think you are right about some of the design decisions, serviceability doesnt appear to be something they took very highly. The engine bay and sail locker part is just crazy. If they didnt mess with the V drive the engine could have been in the cabin as a part of the galley where you could get at it from all around. And if they didnt plaster the aft bulkhead with wiring it would have been easier to use these parts of the boat as a part of the interior plan, either quarter berths and storage or head and shower stall which would mean the couches could be evened up.

and now, the pestilence of the inevitable fotos..

Further South than South is
Hull #103

S/V AMITY

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Re: what am I doing now
« Reply #47 on: January 23, 2018, 10:33:14 AM »
 Good pictures!  Good progress too.
 Have you considered a fuel cell?  See: http://atlinc.com/marine.html

Cheers!

ZULU40

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Re: what am I doing now
« Reply #48 on: January 23, 2018, 01:37:35 PM »
Good pictures!  Good progress too.
 Have you considered a fuel cell?  See: http://atlinc.com/marine.html

Cheers!

thanks, but no
Not sure where Im going with fuel storage. For the moment I have my auxiliary tank, that will get me off the dock and sailing
I think Im looking for least expensive options really
At the moment that is looking like an adaption of a truck fuel tank in steel or aluminium

Further South than South is
Hull #103

ZULU40

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Re: what am I doing now
« Reply #49 on: January 25, 2018, 07:42:34 AM »
What is it that guy says, "it smells like .... victory"

Well if I never do anything else I had my napalm moment today
that damn tank, is finally out of the boat

After near shaking my teeth out with a jigsaw, I relented and picked up a disk grinder with a cutoff wheel instead.
Just because, with the lid off the tank from its deepest end, the one good thing about the soaring temperature here meant that the tank was finally bone dry. So dry even the sweat dripping off me would hit the bottom and evaporate straight away. So I thought, why not...

What took 10 minutes with a jig saw literally fell to pieces in seconds with a cutoff wheel
There was still the issue where the distance in front of the tank and behind didnt allow getting a tool in there. But at least for the front it cuuld be sliced off from inside the tank. Split the diesel affected timbers from in front of the tank, and the tank could be lifted on top of the hull framing and pushed up toward the engine. That gap behind the tank got enough of an increase to get a cutting tool in there and cut through it. Likewise the baffle inside the tank had to be cut to release what was left of the entire top.

Struggle the top section under the helm out of the bay, and there was the bottom of the tank on its own ready to be dragged off the boat. I pulled the bottom of the tank through the stbd locker, and that was it, it was gone. A suitable epitaph would have been to throw it off the boat into the dock, but instead I got a trolley and wheeled it off to the scrap bin.

Not one but two holes, one at the base in the front, and another at the joint on the side where the base of the tank is bent into shape
Photos: base of the tank ready to exit the sail locker; one of the holes in some detail; and the far away shot before departure to the bin.

 
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Hull #103

Nereid

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Re: what am I doing now
« Reply #50 on: January 25, 2018, 12:54:34 PM »
ZULU40,
Looks great! We removed our old tank a few weeks ago, and opted for a smaller plastic one that would (barely) fit through the locker. The old tank was a plywood fiberglass construction.. I couldn't imagine having to cut a metal one out!
Good Job!
-Isaac
S/V Nereid, Hull #193
www.instagram.com/afloataboard/

ZULU40

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Re: what am I doing now
« Reply #51 on: February 06, 2018, 07:11:08 AM »
Ok still waiting for parts to arrive, the alternator, new Blue Sea bus bars and common connectors. The joys of being on the far side of the world in Terra Australis. In the meantime I've begun work fitting the auxiliary tank which will do for the shakedown runs, it holds enough fuel for around 12 hrs at 1600 rpm. And been cleaning up some of the suspicious AC wiring and associated electrical hardware, some of which hit the dock today.

The AC wiring was really pretty disgusting and totally unsafe. I think the way forward is I can lose everything thats been added and rewire that, most of the older stuff is still serviceable. One of the reasons for the shakedown runs is tell me what electronics I need to add, I have almost none. Integrate the two plans together and theres a lot of wiring for the future, but thats in winter.

Some images from today
1. Just positioning the tank in the aft lazarette, figuring out how to attach it. I think a kind of plywood epoxy box trapezoid in shape will be best and a good project to get going on. Other little projects include a battery box and possibly a dingy with collapsible sides to fit over the nose of the coach.

2. The battery charger and some wiring that got ejected out of the boat today. Even if it works (which would be unusual) its not suitable for the AGMs in the house bank. I think I will acquire a CTek smart charger and keep it permanently wired from shore power. The house will be supplied from the CTek, the engine battery from the alternator.

3. Looking sweet on the dock. The light blue smile is where the previous owner left her anchor swinging and scratched the gel coat off. If you can look carefully you can see were his dingy did similar damage around the hull. After just a little fun sailing her she will go back up hard standing to have her topsides tip and roller painted while the weathers good.

4. And speaking of anchors, I havent even had a look at this contraption of a winch yet to see if it works. It looks like theres about 50ft of um 'used' chain in the locker and no rode, so some money to be spent there, and I need to source another anchor as I'm required to have 2.


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Della and Dave

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Re: what am I doing now
« Reply #52 on: February 07, 2018, 01:39:25 AM »
I donít know if you have ever used a nibbler, but that might be a handy tool for that job.  They are available as drill attachments and as stand alone tools.  Good for tight quarters and doesnít throw sparks.   
Della and Dave
S/V Polaris

ZULU40

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Re: what am I doing now
« Reply #53 on: February 07, 2018, 02:05:43 AM »
I donít know if you have ever used a nibbler, but that might be a handy tool for that job.  They are available as drill attachments and as stand alone tools.  Good for tight quarters and doesnít throw sparks.

Yes I have used dedicated nibblers, and it would definitely work better than a jig saw because the material bellying wouldn't occur as it does with a jigsaw. But I think if you were removing the tank without removing the engine the procedure would be the same.

Cut off the fwd top, as that helps dry the tank out and gives access to the baffle within. Then straight around the remainder of the tank. Considering the proximity of the rudder frame assembly aft of the tank and the radial drive pulleys above; if the tool needs more space in manoeuvring (and I think it would) around the aft section then breaking the tank timbers off forward allows you to move the tank forward increasing access aft.

The difference would be hours vs what is effectively minutes cutting time with a cutting wheel, but still if you need to be safe there are few choices. In a way I was fortunate the weather was so hot that with whatever fuel/water/soap mix it had released into the bilge; the fact that the fwd top was cut off dried the thing out out entirely.

« Last Edit: February 07, 2018, 02:07:33 AM by ZULU40 »
Further South than South is
Hull #103

ZULU40

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Re: what am I doing now
« Reply #54 on: March 21, 2018, 08:04:23 AM »
Ok slow progress for a few weeks, but Ive been busy with a few small projects. I had to make a battery box for the engine start battery, and a bracket for the small fuel tank to fit in the lazerette. Both are accomplished out of plywood and fibreglass. The battery box is 1/4" marine ply bonded together in the lower half to make it 1/2" thick with a 1/4" lip about 6" high, over the height of the battery.

In this way the lid fits outside the lip until it contacts the thicker lower side. There are rubber parts inside to prevent the battery moving around too much, but the confines are quite tight in any event. The plywood is covered on the flat areas with woven rovings, 2" glass tape is used on all the edges to provide additional strength.
A rubber strop fastens the top to the bottom of the box attached by kitchen draw knobs screwed and epoxied in place.

The bracket is also marine ply, similarly covered on the flat sections with woven rovings, and tape on the edges. I did it this way because the plywood in this case is just 3/8" thick and its hard to control or form decent edges folding the woven rovings over. 3/8" is too thin to make a decent rounded edge, but tape allows you to affix one side, then roll it over the edge when the first side is set. This offers just a bit more control and allows good contact with the tape to the edge and the edges of the glass on the flat surfaces. Four plywood inner webs tabbed between two similar previously described sheets make a very light but remarkably stiff interface to suspend the tank from just one edge of the lazerette.

Also acquired a 20A 12v xantrex 3 bank charger and had that aboard assessing the run of wiring and where to mount the charger. I completely forgot to get adequate connections for the wire ends so I shall have to go back to the chandlers tomorrow.

Apologies for the vignet on some of the photos, its from the aperture around the lens in the cover my ipad.

« Last Edit: March 21, 2018, 08:06:30 AM by ZULU40 »
Further South than South is
Hull #103

ZULU40

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Re: what am I doing now
« Reply #55 on: March 26, 2018, 06:44:45 AM »
Finally the battery box is together with a rewired battery pulling 1000 CCA, and hooked up to the Xantrex 20A charger off shore power. I removed a lot of 240v power wiring and left it quite simple, 240v to a circuit breaker, into a distribution box which simply connects the charger and a dual outlet. Several other outlets have been dismissed in the process. I was going to dump all of them overboard but I guess I weakened, and Im glad I did.

This allows me the utility of using ordinary power tools on the boat, and the hot water heater off the mains supply. The luxury of a low voltage pressure water system and hot hot water :) The hot water system is also supposed to run off a 12 volt supply but I haven't figured out how that is supposed to work yet. If for some reason that doesn't work out there is always the possibility of using a 3000 watt inverter off the house supply. Either way it gets me there.

Also working at converting/replacing existing fuses to blade fuses as a standardisation. I must say Im enjoying the electrical work, its not super expensive and Im able to figure out the maze of wiring which was at first a bit daunting. One baffling thing are the two wires off the alternator to what looks like an oil pressure switch on the side of the engine block. I know where they go but I simply cant remember which way around they go, and Im thinking that matters.

« Last Edit: March 26, 2018, 06:47:59 AM by ZULU40 »
Further South than South is
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ZULU40

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Re: what am I doing now
« Reply #56 on: April 07, 2018, 09:11:08 AM »
Finally the 240AC has been stripped out of the boat and an all new simpler and somewhat basic layout commissioned.

Power is now in flexible conduit from the plug to a relocated IP67 box in the cabin containing an RCD.
The previous supply only had flexible conduit part way and ran alongside the exhaust system
Now it runs just underneath the cockpit combing and is conduit end to end.
Power is then distributed via a junction box to a Xanex 20A charger and 240v dual outlet.
All the 240ac is in conduit and all the other old outlets except for one have been let go.

Save for supplying the charger I didnt want any 240ac originally but its just not practical to have to resource for new tools etc just to maintain the boat.
Given that the hot water service can again be 240ac or off of 12v, and any functioning 240v tool can be worked from the dual outlet just inside the hatch.
I should probably make that a 15A weatherproof power point instead of what is a normal house supply powerpoint.

Its just so nice to have hot and cold pressure water anywhere on the boat and to be able to fund that ashore or off shore.

Tomorrow I will finish the fuel tank supply and return lines and probably replace the fuel filter. I shall have to gerry can fuel to the tank as we have no power to get to the fuel dock. There are a lot of distractions in discovering little jobs in the 12v distribution, such as bayonet joints to wire ends instead of just winding wire around the terminal.
And I still have to fit a few bus bars I bought from Blue Sea, and complete the bonding system on the boat.

Im accumulating lots of holes around the boat from bits that have been removed, bit perplexed as to what to do with them, but I might just drill out all the unwanted holes to the same size and use power point screw hole fillers.

« Last Edit: April 07, 2018, 09:13:47 AM by ZULU40 »
Further South than South is
Hull #103

ZULU40

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Re: what am I doing now
« Reply #57 on: April 26, 2018, 09:44:33 AM »
So a visit from the sailmaker to tune the rig sees the stay connecting the main and the mizzen connected, (finally)
and we measured up for a sailbag for the main and a cover for the mizzen which will both be off white.
Jackstays will get replaced with triple drops

I changed the fuel filters for the Raycor and the one on the 108
and fuel lines from the auxiliary tank to the engine was connected and lines fastened into place.

This presented the opportunity to start the engine again so I bled the pump and the filters
After fumbling the fuel on/off a third try on a serious attempt to start saw the engine fire up
After a few more starts I left her running for 15 mins or so with about 5 mins at 1600 rpm

In a few days I shall run the engine at the dock for an hour and just make sure nothing goes awry

so here she is with and without the stay connected and sails lashed to the booms
« Last Edit: April 26, 2018, 09:47:41 AM by ZULU40 »
Further South than South is
Hull #103

ZULU40

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Re: what am I doing now
« Reply #58 on: May 05, 2018, 05:30:19 AM »
Not all that much to report, just a few things that took forever to execute. Its a boat!

I had the engine running several times, once for over an hour, to make sure its ok and to warm the oil up for an oil change. It all seemed in the green with 50psi oil and temp hovering 170F. I checked the flooded cell engine start battery voltage before and after the engine was running, 12.8v before and 12.7v after. I think the alternator isnt charging. :(

Getting to the filter required taking chunks of the interior apart, and making some alterations to the filter spanner. This version of the filter is horizontal and has very little clearance behind it. So the strap of the filter spanner needed to be released to wrap around the filter, and resecured with a bolt. Its a pretty awkward arrangement. Filter finally changed and oil out I added 3.8 litres of SAE30 10w-30 Nulon oil, but it hasnt made the bottom of the dipstick yet, so Im guessing how much capacity the filter holds to bring the level up.

Going to rebuild the switchbox and incorporate a fusebox with blade fuses.
This one will be 20 switches with LED strikes hooked to two blade fuseboxes both with positive commons and LED fault lights for each circuit.
The present installation has only 12 switches and duplicated pretty much haphazard wiring. It is inadequate for several additions made to the boat where I want every circuit with the potential to be isolated. And I want as much of the electrical control situated in the same place instead of all over the boat as it is.

In this light Im looking around for some acrylic, black for the panel and red translucent for a visual alarm behind it.
If anyone knows an enduring way to label switches that would be appreciated ..
« Last Edit: May 05, 2018, 05:37:02 AM by ZULU40 »
Further South than South is
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DeanA

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Re: what am I doing now
« Reply #59 on: May 08, 2018, 09:00:40 PM »
Super looking job on the battery box!
Regarding the rigging, looks like the main and mizzen mast are about vertical and parallel. Is that correct and recommended? Our mizzen has a slight tilt toward aft and a rigger had tuned it up that way. Always wondered if that was correct.