Author Topic: Onboard Food  (Read 511 times)

Maruska

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Onboard Food
« on: February 07, 2017, 01:12:31 PM »
It has been far and few between that we have spent a whole week on the boat.  Most of the time we are with in close proximity to civilization so food has never been an issue.  We have a microwave aboard that the inverter runs wonderfully.  Breakfast is typically done in the microwave and we reheat burgers, dogs and sausage off of the stern grill as necessary.  A couple of years back I got the 3 burner with oven all working. One of my favorite things to do in the oven is pop-n-fresh dinner rolls.

All that being said, moving the boat to Maine and shifting our use form day sailing and evening sails with the occasional long weekend trip to a week at a time means more food preparation aboard.  I know there are plenty of places to acquire substance in Maine but the majority of our intake will become home made. 

Do you galley slaves have any tips and tricks?  Are there MRE's out there that you use when offshore?  How extravagant do you all get?  We had a Slocum 42 in buffalo owned by a retired bakery owner.  He had an elaborate set up aboard and made fresh bread and rolls daily all the way across the Atlantic.  I'm not the cook by any stretch of the imagination but I like to eat and I know my wife Sharon will appreciate any and all input.  Keep in mind we will not be in the tropics and I have been known to cast a line or two.

Thanks in advance....   Dale
"Maruska"
Pearson 365 Cutter Ketch
1976 Hull #40
Buffalo, N.Y.

jpendoley

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Re: Onboard Food
« Reply #1 on: February 07, 2017, 01:43:19 PM »
Dale,
Cooking and eating aboard is one of the best parts about cruising IMHO.  Diane and I have had lots of memorable meals aboard, some complex and some less so.  So long as you have refrigeration, your choices are only limited by your imagination and ambition.  I do think simpler one pot meals are preferable, if only because the clean up is so much easier.  I've baked pies and bread, whole chickens and roasts, essentially anything I could prepare at home I can prepare aboard.  The idea of living on microwave fare would take a lot of the pleasure out of cruising for me.The grill is your friend, less heat in the cabin and less cleanup.
Candle light dinners prepared by you will be much admired by Sharon...just sayin....

SVJourney

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Re: Onboard Food
« Reply #2 on: February 08, 2017, 02:56:31 AM »
One of the ways I tempted Dana into going cruising was by telling her that she could cook to her hearts content, using ingredients from local vendors and in local style.  More relevant when cruising in weird places, but I'm sure Maine has its local fare that you can cook.  GalleyWenchTales.com is full of cooking tips on the boat. 

For you, I'd suggest a pressure cooker, or at least a large pot for shell food, lobster bisque, fisherman's stew.  Yum!
www.GalleyWenchTales.com is our cruising blog.  Stop in and see our 365 through over 17000 miles of cruising.

Maruska

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Re: Onboard Food
« Reply #3 on: February 08, 2017, 09:33:03 AM »
Good advice and I have read that a pressure cooker is a must have on a boat, however in New York State the governor made it illegal to own a pressure cooker.  I will have to wait until I get to Maine before I have the same rights an everyone else and can purchase one legally.  I could always head to a seedy part of town and buy one out of somebody trunk.

It could be worse, in Canada our customers tell us a flare gun is considered a weapon and they can not carry them.

Dale
"Maruska"
Pearson 365 Cutter Ketch
1976 Hull #40
Buffalo, N.Y.

S/V Deo Volente

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Re: Onboard Food
« Reply #4 on: February 08, 2017, 11:04:27 AM »
I had a Canadian Customs Officer examine my flare gun years ago and ask suspiciously "what is this" I said it's a flare launcher and he handed it back. It has never come up since. I do like the pressure cooker. One of my favorites in cool weather is a pork roast, under pressure for 15 minutes, quick release, then add carrots, potatoes onions, cabbage and rutabaga. Bring up to pressure for another 15 minutes and quick release. One pot hearty meal. We have a good freezer so make some things up ahead and freeze them. Sloppy Joes, Pulled Pork, lasagna. We grill too, I try to use boneless cuts to keep the trash down.

Just Found This

http://www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/cfp-pcaf/faq/reg-enr-eng.htm#c10
« Last Edit: February 08, 2017, 11:18:36 AM by S/V Deo Volente »
"S/V Deo Volente"
Pearson 365 Pilothouse
Hull #17 1980
Duluth Minnesota
Bob

CaptCG

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Re: Onboard Food
« Reply #5 on: May 30, 2017, 09:38:29 AM »
As a solo sailor, and one who likes simplicity, I find that freeze-dried foods, especially the Mountain House brand, works well and tastes good.  Some are a bit pricey, but the convenience of only having to add hot water to most of the preparations, makes it worth it.  Fresh fruits, V8, healthy snacks, and canned soups are also enjoyed.
CG Neumann, s/v Sea Hiker #302

Della and Dave

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Re: Onboard Food
« Reply #6 on: May 31, 2017, 03:26:17 AM »
I also like the pressure cooker, we have a titanium one, just for extra geek points.  It is nice to take the pressure cooker regulator weight off because it is a pot lid that locks when you aren't using it as a pressure cooker.  Great for soups and stews and cuts down on spills.  One pot meals are great.

We like to do pancakes an Jimmy dean pre cooked frozen sausage for breakfast.  Cleanup after can be an issue. We drive through a pass on the way to the boat that sometimes has good blueberries.   If you miss a spot of grease or spattered butter from  the frying pan it can be mold city later.  The instant coffee packets like you get from Starbucks or knock offs are convenient.  We have an electrical hot water pot for shore use on shore power for morning coffee.  Heavy rat killer mugs that hold the heat and are tough.  One pancake company make the mix in a bottle that all you have to do is add water and shake.   Low mess.   

We have canned moose meat with a little basil, bay leaf and garlic when it was put up in ball jars from my brother in law.  Great mixed with rice.  Same with Salmon.   I bet there are some great local stuff in Maine. 

I did Chicken Tika Masala on our ASA bareboat class.  Worked well with the chicken in a zip lock bag marinating prepared ashore and just cooked on the boat. Lots of good marinating in zip lock ideas.   Boil in the bag rice is nice and easy too. 
Della and Dave
S/V Polaris